Outdoor Museum: Artistic Expressions at UPRM

By: Claralys Hernández  Santiago

Serpentinata Caribeña

The sculpture "Serpentinata Caribeña" by the French Guy Rougemont, is 19.8 feet high and made by steel painted in purple, blue and yellow colors. The Mayagüez Campus acquired the piece during the celebration of the Third International Sculpture Symposium held in 2004 in the Office of the President of the University of Puerto Rico. As part of that event, 11 national and international artists were invited to prepare sculptures that eventually acquired each of the units of the UPR system.

The sculpture Serpentinata Caribeña by the French Guy Rougemont, is 19.8 feet high and made by steel painted in purple, blue and yellow colors. The Mayagüez Campus acquired the piece during the celebration of the Third International Sculpture Symposium held in 2004 in the Office of the President of the University of Puerto Rico. As part of that event, 11 national and international artists were invited to prepare sculptures that eventually acquired each of the units of the UPR system.

Door for Dreaming

The stainless steel sculpture called Puerta para Soñar (“Door for Dreaming”)  by artist Carmen Inés Blondet is located in the gardens between the house of the rector and José de Diego building. On June 30, 1997, the art piece was placed as the occasion of the UPRM 85th Anniversary. On the work nameplate the artist leaves us the following message: “A door separates the living reality, of the illusion of dreaming, creating awareness that the truth we know is relative and that we can dream of knowing.”

The stainless steel sculpture called Puerta para Soñar (“Door for Dreaming”) by artist Carmen Inés Blondet is located in the gardens between the house of the rector and José de Diego building. On June 30, 1997, the art piece was placed as the occasion of the UPRM 85th Anniversary. On the work nameplate the artist leaves us the following message: “A door separates the living reality, of the illusion of dreaming, creating awareness that the truth we know is relative and that we can dream of knowing.”

Wings I

In the library garden, facing to the Palmeras Avenue is the sculpture Wings I by the American artist Kenneth Snelson, made of metal tubes of different diameters and tensioned cables. The work of 22.7 feet was installed by the artist himself on December 27-28, 2004. Snelson is considered the father of tensegrity, a technique used in the art of sculpture commonly consisting of parts joined by a continuous network of tensed cables, which keeps the material compressed without the parts touch each other.

In the library garden, facing to the Palmeras Avenue is the sculpture Wings I by the American artist Kenneth Snelson, made of metal tubes of different diameters and tensioned cables. The work of 22.7 feet was installed by the artist himself on December 27-28, 2004. Snelson is considered the father of tensegrity, a technique used in the art of sculpture commonly consisting of parts joined by a continuous network of tensed cables, which keeps the material compressed without the parts touch each other.

The Tree of Life

The bronze sculpture El Árbol de la Vida (“The Tree of Life ”), by Puerto Rican artist José Ángel Buscaglia Guillermety is located on the side of the José de Diego building. The work, which has 15 feet of height was designed in 1967, transferred from Spain, and placed facing what was once the Post street. Years later is forgotten in the Physical Plant Welding Workshop, where the professor Lydia González Quevedo and some of her students found it in 2002; its restoration is requested and in 2004 reinstalls the place it occupies today.

The bronze sculpture El Árbol de la Vida (“The Tree of Life ”), by Puerto Rican artist José Ángel Buscaglia Guillermety is located on the side of the José de Diego building. The work, which has 15 feet of height was designed in 1967, transferred from Spain, and placed facing what was once the Post street. Years later is forgotten in the Physical Plant Welding Workshop, where the professor Lydia González Quevedo and some of her students found it in 2002; its restoration is requested and in 2004 reinstalls the place it occupies today.

100 Sculpture

The Centenary Sculpture by the Mayagüez artist Angel Ruiz Agostini, made of polished stainless steel is placed in the yard of the Luis de Celis building. With the unveiling of the artpiece on September 26, 2013 was celebrated the 102 Anniversary of RUM and the culmination of the series of emblematic projects carried out by the Centenary Committee. The work of 30 feet of height represents in abstract the number 100 and is the main icon for the now “Plaza Centenaria”.

The Centenary Sculpture by the Mayagüez artist Angel Ruiz Agostini, made of polished stainless steel is placed in the yard of the Luis de Celis building. With the unveiling of the artpiece on September 26, 2013 was celebrated the 102 Anniversary of RUM and the culmination of the series of emblematic projects carried out by the Centenary Committee. The work of 30 feet of height represents in abstract the number 100 and is the main icon for the now “Plaza Centenaria”.

Don Quijote

The sculpture, seven feet tall in stainless steel, El Quijote by Ricardo López Ramos, adorns the lobby of Carlos E. Chardón building. It formed part of the more recently acquired works by the UPRM, was a gift made by Generoso Trigo and Laura Tristani both retired professors. The character of the sculpture have engraved on his shield the phrase in spanish “soñemos por un mundo mejor (let’s dream for a better world).”

The sculpture, seven feet tall in stainless steel, El Quijote by Ricardo López Ramos, adorns the lobby of Carlos E. Chardón building. It formed part of the more recently acquired works by the UPRM, was a gift made by Generoso Trigo and Laura Tristani both retired professors.
The character of the sculpture have engraved on his shield the phrase in spanish “soñemos por un mundo mejor (let’s dream for a better world).”

The Drowning Of Salcedo

The mural 18 feet high and 27 wide, called El Ahogamiento de Salcedo (“The Drowning of Salcedo”) by the painter Denis Caro is part of the range of art housed in the General Library. It was the first of two murals, of same size, did the painter of Italian and Puerto Rican descent in 1976. The idea for this first mural was from the rector Rafael Pietri Oms and then as gratitude, the artist created his second painting called El Origen de Boriquen (“The Origin of Boriquen”), which today is located facing the wall exhibiting the first.

The mural 18 feet high and 27 wide, called El Ahogamiento de Salcedo (“The Drowning of Salcedo”) by the painter Denis Caro is part of the range of art housed in the General Library. It was the first of two murals, of same size, did the painter of Italian and Puerto Rican descent in 1976. The idea for this first mural was from the rector Rafael Pietri Oms and then as gratitude, the artist created his second painting called El Origen de Boriquen (“The Origin of Boriquen”), which today is located facing the wall exhibiting the first.

2000’s Historic Monument

The Monumento Histórico 2000 (“2000 Historic Monument”) by Julio Suarez, which is made of aluminum and concrete is located at the side of Professors Offices building. The sculpture with 18.7 feet of height was donated by the graduated class of 1950 from CAAM in celebration of the UPRM 89th Anniversary. At that time came 103 alumni from the class of 1950 in celebration of their 50 years graduation and to become sponsors of the class of 2000.

The Monumento Histórico 2000 (“2000 Historic Monument”) by Julio Suarez, which is made of aluminum and concrete is located at the side of Professors Offices building. The sculpture with 18.7 feet of height was donated by the graduated class of 1950 from CAAM in celebration of the UPRM 89th Anniversary. At that time came 103 alumni from the class of 1950 in celebration of their 50 years graduation and to become sponsors of the class of 2000.

Silema II

The sculpture made with black, silver and red painted steel, Silema II by the artist and professor María Matos is located in front of Biology building. The artist created and donated the work in 2005 during the inauguration of that building. The piece of art is based on the silema, the part of vascular plants where they absorb water and minerals.

The sculpture made with black, silver and red painted steel, Silema II by the artist and professor María Matos is located in front of Biology building. The artist created and donated the work in 2005 during the inauguration of that building. The piece of art is based on the silema, the part of vascular plants where they absorb water and minerals.

Portrait of Luis Monzón

The oil painting of 1959 by Tulio Ojeda, Portrait of Luis Monzón, is located in the lobby of Luis Carlos Monzón Building. The work was created in honor of chemical engineer, Luis C. Monzón who graduated from the class of 1918 from the College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (CAAM for its acronym in Spanish), formed part of its faculty and was the first president of the Alumni Association. The Monzón building built in 1939, was the first engineering building and then was the chemistry building before hosting the Department of Mathematics.

The oil painting of 1959 by Tulio Ojeda, Portrait of Luis Monzón, is located in the lobby of Luis Carlos Monzón Building. The work was created in honor of chemical engineer, Luis C. Monzón who graduated from the class of 1918 from the College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (CAAM for its acronym in Spanish), formed part of its faculty and was the first president of the Alumni Association. The Monzón building built in 1939, was the first engineering building and then was the chemistry building before hosting the Department of Mathematics.

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